The lie of isolation (half 1 of seven) – Bible Type

The lie of isolation (half 1 of seven)

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"How long, OLORD? Willyouforgetmeforever?
How long do you want to hide your face from yourself?

HowlongmustItakecounselinmysoul
and have tomorrow in my heart all day?
How long should I go beyond myself?

Psalm 13: 1-2

Alistair Begg

Read by Alistair Begg

People say time flies when you're having fun. But when things shift into a minor key, life seems to be moving in slow motion. We often think, "I don't know if I will ever get out of this."

This verse contains a recurring question: "How long? How long? "David's circumstances are not described, but he clearly feels forgotten and abandoned – a feeling with which we can all identify. It is comparable to what we feel when we lose a loved one.

In his emerging depression we discover that his perception, as is often the case with ours, does not reflect reality. What he believes to be true does not match what he knows is true.

To be isolated from human relationships is without a doubt devastating. But what David writes here is even more important. It expresses a feeling of isolation from God himself. In his emerging depression we discover that his perception, as is often the case with ours, does not reflect reality. What he believes to be true does not match what he knows is true.

The feeling of the psalmist is shared by many people of God throughout Scripture. In Isaiah, God's exiled people cry out: “The Lord has left me; My lord has forgotten me. “1 Christian pilgrims – true followers and servants of Jesus – occasionally had the feeling to say:“ I think the Lord has actually forgotten us. If he didn't forget us, if he was still with us, how would we be in this emergency? If he really watched over us, we would surely not have to endure these trials. "

Christians, let's not believe the lie of isolation that our emotions can feed us. We can find peace in God's comforting answer to his forgetful people: "Can a woman forget her nursing child that she should not have pity on the son of her body? These may forget too, but I will not forget you. See, I engraved you in the palm of my hand; Your walls are always in front of me. “2

God's care for his children is like the sun: it is constant. Even if the clouds cover it up, it's still there. It is always there.

Will we trust God's permanence today? Amidst our feeling of being abandoned, God looks at his hands, each of which our names are engraved on, and says: “There you are. I have not forgotten you."

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